Occasional report series PDF Print E-mail

 

This page is a compilation of reports that have been produced as part of ACEAS broader activity

 

  • Report 1: Data systems: semantics, data sharing and documentation of analysis (2010)
  • Report 2: Exploring interdisciplinary collaboration in Australia's ecosystem science and management community (2012)
  • Report 3: ACEAS mid-term review (2013).
  • Report 4: ACEAS Feedback analysis 2010-2013
  • Report 5: VAST-2 Handbook (version 3)
  • Report 6: Structured Reflections white paper
  • Report 7: ACEAS Grand Rapporteur's report
  • Report 8: ACEAS Socio-economic study
  • Report 9: Conservation Atlas Data retrieval

 


 

Report 1: Data systems: semantics, data sharing and documentation of analysis

This is the report of a workshop run in May 2010 with representatives of major Australian data repositories and Mark Schildhauer and Matt Jones from the National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, in Santa Barbara the United States of America.

Specht, A. (Ed) (2010) Data systems: semantics, data sharing, and documentation of analysis at the national scale–an NCEAS-ACEAS collaboration. ACEAS-TERN Report No. 1, 32 pp.

Link to the web site for this meeting

Download PDF Download report here

 

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Report 2: Exploring interdisciplinary collaboration in Australia’s ecosystem science and management community

Below is an overview of the research. For more details, download the summary report

Interdisciplinary collaboration amongst ecosystem scientists and managers is vital for developing innovative solutions to the complex issues surrounding Australia’s changing ecosystems.

Who is engaging in interdisciplinary collaboration in Australia’s ecosystem science and management community? What are the barriers to collaboration? Is interdisciplinary collaboration important?

These were some of the questions investigated by Lucy Keniger, a University of Queensland Masters student who explored the factors associated with interdisciplinary research collaboration in the Australian ecosystem science and management community.

Overall, 751 ecosystem scientists and managers responded to an online survey from December 2011 to February 2012.

 

Read more...

 

Download PDF Download report here

 

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Report 3: The ACEAS mid-term review, June 2013.

 

The overwhelming conclusion in this report was that ACEAS is a program that is:

 

"highly functional, widely appreciated as fulfilling a unique role and is making good progress towards all of the principles that guide it, which are:

 

(i)      facilitating the advancement of pure and applied ecosystem knowledge through the search for spatial and temporal patterns and principles in existing data;


(ii)      improving the organization and synthesis of ecosystem information in a manner useful to researchers, resource managers, and policy makers addressing important   natural resource management issues;


(iii)     influencing the way ecosystem research is conducted in the future, in both the short and long term, by promoting a culture of synthesis, collaboration, and data sharing;


(iv)    promoting integrative research and the principles of ecosystem science to facilitate linkages between all ecosystem disciplines and the natural resource management community;


(v)     serving as a conduit between the ecosystem and natural resource management communities in the development of innovative management strategies for sustainable management of Australia’s natural resources and the maintenance of biodiversity; and


(vi)    assisting in planning the evolution of TERN into the future. In particular, to determine the types of data and new infrastructure required to address remaining major applied and pure questions in ecosystem science."

 

To read more, and see their recommendations, download the report here (Large 7 Mb) or Here (2.5Mb)

 

citation

Price, R.J and Cork, S.J. (2013) The Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis: A mid-term review. ACEAS-TERN Report, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

 

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Report 4: ACEAS Feedback analysis 2010-13

 

Each meeting we have asked the participants for their feedback. This has resulted in an impressive collation of opinion and comment, some of which was analysed for the mid-term review and is included as an Appendix in that. It is hard to read there, however, so it is attached here for reference. Many thanks to all the participants who have assisted us improve our practice and understand more about the contribution both you and ACEAS make to your community.

 

To see the full report, download here.

 

citation

Weber, E., Brisbane, S. and Specht, A. (2013) ACEAS Feedback analysis 2010-2013. Internal paper 33pp The University of Queensland, Brisbane

 

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Report 5: VAST-2 Handbook

 

The VAST-2 System has been developed as a result of Richard's ACEAS work, and the method is explained in the Manual downloadable here [pdf approx 3.5MB]

 

citation

Thackway, R. (2014). VAST-2 Tracking the Transformation of Vegetated Landscapes, Handbook for recording site-based effects of land use and land management practices on the condition of native plant communities, Version 3.0, June 2014. Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network, The University of Queensland, Brisbane. pp35.

 

 

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Report 6: Some key reflections from the ACEAS Workshop, Structured reflections on Australia’s national environmental research programs.

 

This report is an interim outcome of this workshop, and can be downloaded here. It is also found on the group's web site.

 

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Report 7: Science Making Sense: the role of trans-disciplinary synthesis

 

Mark Flanigan provided, at ACEAS' request, a summary of the ACEAS Grand Workshop 2014, providing background for future stages of ACEAS' development. The report is downloadable here.

 

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Report 8: ACEAS Socio-economic study

 

A socio-economic analysis of ACEAS was an important recommendation made in the mid-term review (Price and Cork, 2013). This preliminary economic and social analysis across ACEAS activities established a framework for estimating the value of ACEAS investment. RMCG was commissioned to conduct the study for ACEAS.

 

citation

RMCG (2014) Socio-economic Analysis for the Australian Centre for Ecological Analysis & Synthesis 89pp The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

 

The report is downloadable here

 

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Report 9: Retrieval of the Data from the Conservation Atlas

 

Collecting field data is an onerous task, involving commitment of time and money and venturing into the wilderness (or not). The data collected on each and every occasion is unique and precious, but the custodianship of such data is difficult, as technologies, systems and fashions change. This is a special project to convert collated species lists prepared for the Conservation Atlas of Plant Communities in Australia (Specht et al. 1995) from paper and digital text formats (species codes x locations x publications) into a collection of species observation records using the Darwin Core international standard so they can be made available using on-line data repositories, specifically those of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network and the Atlas of Living Australia.

 

The data released will complement other collection methods, giving a more complete picture of any particular location in space and time. The effort required in the recovery of these data demonstrate the imperative of ensuring any and all biodiversity data needs to be urgently integrated into a national repository before it is lost.

 

reference: Specht, R.L., Specht, A., Whelan, M.B. and Hegarty, E.E. (1995) Conservation Atlas of Plant Communities in Australia. Southern Cross University Press in association with the Centre for Coastal Management, Lismore, NSW, Australia

 

The report is downloadable here

 


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Last Updated on Thursday, 04 September 2014 10:50