Final Reports PDF Print E-mail

The final reports are summaries of the group activity and are a required outcome of support from ACEAS. They are living documents, in that, as papers and other products emerge, they will be updated. The reports are also to be found on each group’s web page, in which information on progress through their time with ACEAS and photographs of the group members can be found.

 

They are organised according to the following themes:

 

Biodiversity

Water

Management

Handling data and information

 


 

Biodiversity

 

Vast lands and variable data: systematic analyses to understand the patterns and processes of mammal decline

This Working Group was led by Alex Kutt and the team of seventeen people from around the world pulled data together around the alarming statistics emerging about small mammal extinction in the north of Australia, which until recent years had escaped the southern trends. Why is it so, and what are the major causes were some of the questions they posed.

Link to their page
Download final report [1.4MB]

 


Conserving koalas in the 21st century: synthesising the dynamics of Australia's koala populations

This Working Group was led by Clive McAlpine, and tackled the difficult topic of an iconic species, with a widely differing status in different parts of its range. This approach provides an exemplar for the assembly of both expert and quantitative information around population, habitat requirements, and projected change.

Link to their page
Download final report [1.9MB]

 

 

Avifaunal disarray from a single despotic species

Martine Maron led this Working Group in tackling the thorny question of how to manage aggressive Manorinas to restore bird assemblages. This report neatly summarises the problem, and proposes a variety of approaches, some quite direct, to prevent this unique group of native species eradicating many others.

Link to their page
Download their final report [0.7 MB]

 

 

Extinction risks of frogs under climate change

David Keith led a team of researchers in coupling population data and life history knowledge with traditional correlative distribution models to strengthen predictions of biodiversity impacts from climate change. This report shows the projected population profiles for a range of frog species, most of whose distributions  were projected to decline in the future, particularly related to fire frequency.

Link to their page
Download their final report [1.3 MB]

 

Molecules in models: the future role of genetic data in population viability analysis

Andrew Young and Jenny Pierson led a team of researchers looking at the effectiveness of population viability analysis in recovery planning for species in Australia. Their conclusions are that the focus remain on PVAs as decision-support tools for evaluating relative differences among scenarios such as competing management options, for sensitivity analyses to compare the relative importance of data inputs and processes, and for informing research agendas.

Link to their page
Download their final report [910k]


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Water

 

Local to National–the capacity for increasing the spatial scale of monitoring

This Workshop team was led by Fran Sheldon and Erin Peterson, and is the first of three workshops run in association with the Australian Rivers Institute at Griffith University, whose head, Prof. Stuart Bunn, was an initial partner of TERN. The group focussed on the difficulties of scaling up to catchment scale from small, localised measurements and vice versa.

Link to their page
Download final report [0.7MB]


 

Environmental Flows. Developing ecologically meaningful metrics to advance environmental flow ecology

This Workshop team was led by Harry Balcombe, and their major findings will emerge in two papers in the refereed literature. This final report summarises the process to that point.

Link to their page
Download final report [1 MB]

 

 

 

Forest drought and mortality

Tony O'Grady, Pat Mitchell and a team of field and experimental researchers, modellers and end-users integrated their current understanding of forest mortality with stand and landscape-level process to determine forest vulnerability under future climates. From the data collected they have been able to develop an improved understanding of vegetation vulnerability to future climate change.

Link to their page
Download their final report [1.3 MB]

 

 

Integrated catchment-to-coast planning: data, decision support, and governance

Bob Pressey and Allan Dale brought together a wide range of catchment managers from across the Top End, building on work being conducted in a National Environmental Research Program hub on northern Australia. In their three meetings they have been developing a generalised approach for catchment to coast planning, with the aim of strengthening the decision making ability of natural resource managers.

Link to their page
Download their final report [1.5MB]

 

 

Adaptation pathways for aquatic plants under climate change: facilitating dispersal and management interventions

Prof. Max Finlayson brought together a group that focussed on the ability of the biota that occupy our freshwater wetlands to withstand changes in the proportion of wet/dry periods predicted for the future, either due to climate or landuse change. The group has developed a protocol to catalogue the vast array of wetland types and plants that occupy them which will enable water and wetlands managers the tools to better predict the effects of their interventions.

Link to their page
Download their final report [1.6MB]

 


Australian seagrass habitats: condition and threats

James Udy from Healthy Waterways, Queensland, collected a team of researchers and managers together from around the country to update the spatial detail and accuracy of the 2000 and 2008 estimates of seagrass distribution in Australia, and to develop a risk assessment tool that could be applied at a national scale, among other objectives. One of the main outcomes has been a zonation of seagrass occurrence around the coastline that feeds into a framework for determining the most important scales for different management concerns and questions.

Link to their page

Download their final report [2MB]

 

 

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Management

 

Pyrogeography: integrating and evaluating existing models of Australian fire regimes to predict climate change impacts
This Working Group was led by Brett Murphy, and the team of thirteen people from around the world examined the idea of ‘fire countries’ and how these will change in the advent of global climate change. One of the major contributions of their work is a methodology for the assessment of the vulnerability of our vegetation to fire at a national scale.

Link to their page
Download final report [3.1MB]

 


Transformational change of regional landscapes: navigating planetary limits and resource constraints over the next five decades
This Workshop team was led by Wayne Meyer, in which fourteen people focussed on the future of our agricultural landscapes under the various projections of future change, from peak phosphorus to the effects of global climate change. They applied some new approaches to the evaluation of these risks, the result of which is presented in this report.

Link to their page
Download final report [1.3MB]



Transformation of Australia's vegetated landscapes: the development of VAST-2

This report stems from Richard Thackway's work as a sabbatical fellow with ACEAS. Richard tackled the problem of how to not only document but also quantify the effects of historical change. The argument being that appropriate management of the landscape cannot proceed, as the legacy of past change effects actions into the future.

Link to Richard's page
Download his final report [1.4MB]



C & N Dynamics. Improving long-term predictions of carbon and nutrient dynamics in Australia's agro-ecosystems: assimilation of datasets from long-term research sites for verification of biophysical models of vegetation and soil changes.

This Working Group was led by Beverley Henry, and collected data from several long-term agro-ecosystem trials throughout Australia to tackle, as their title suggests, the predictions of our carbon and nitrogen future. Outcomes include a better understanding of dataset requirements for modelling and the differing contributions various modelling approaches can make.

Link to their page
Download final report [1.5MB]

 

 

 

Ecosystem services and livelihood opportunities for Indigenous rural communities in savanna landscapes

This Workshop team, led by Jeremy Russell-Smith, brought together people from around the Arafura Sea to investigate options for sustainable development using approaches developed by Prof. Bob Costanza. The workshop was directly supported by the United Nations University, Charles Darwin University and CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences. This report forms part of a larger work program.

Link to their page
Download their final report [0.6 MB]

 


Integrating Measures of Phylogenetic and Taxonomic Diversity and Endemism into National Conservation Assessment

Tania Laity who works with the Australian Natural Heritage Assessment Tool (ANHAT), brought a team of managers and researchers together to flesh out approaches to incorporate evolutionary history of organisms into conservation assessments.  This will improve understanding of the comparative biogeography of a diverse range of plant, vertebrate and invertebrate taxa.

Link to their page
Download their final report [710k]

 

 

Linking national-scale remote sensed ground cover to land management priorities

Accurate and timely information on ground cover condition is a key data input for assessing the effect of land management practices and climate related effects such as droughts. Juan Guerschman and Peter Scarth brought together the expertise required to synthesise existing information to address and report on questions related to state, change and the effects of alternative land management practices in the Australian rangelands. The interactions between the remote-sensing community and the rangelands practitioners at this workshop was a key step towards capitalising on the best information.

Link to their page
Download their final report [2.2M]

 


Using plant functional traits to predict ecosystem vulnerability to changing fire regimes

Australian species are notable for their re-sprouting behaviour post-fire, leading to the common (but somewhat lamentable) phrase "Australian ecosystems are fire adapted". But is this so? This group brought together three elements for the first time to demonstrate that plant fire response traits differ among growth forms and ecosystems because of the historically contingent effects of climate, soils and fire. This systematic approach greatly improves prediction of the effects of fire into the future on this flammable continent.

Link to their page

Download their final report [1.4MB]

 


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Handling data and information

 

Environmental Bio-acoustic monitoring

This group emerged from the TERN community and they investigated the application of systematic bio-acoustic monitoring in the assessment of ecosystem status, particularly on the TERN SupersiteNetwork. They had one workshop, and their work is part of ongoing activity in the bio-acoustic monitoring community within TERN and elsewhere.

Link to their page
Download their final report [
1 MB]

 


Integration of remote sensing and land surface models

This group emerged from the TERN community with the challenge of integrating data from Ozflux towers with remote information from AusCover and involved the participation of the eMAST team. This report is as much describing the approach of these teams as it is about the workshop itself.

Link to their page
Download their final report [1.5 MB]


 

Advancing the application of animal telemetry data in ecosystem management

This group, led by Hamish Campbell, focussed on assessing the contribution animal telemetry has made to ecosystem science in Australia and New Zealand. This report forms part of their findings, and provides a snapshot of the data collected to date, making recommendations about a central repository for telemetry data, so it can be used for many purposes rather than be lost in private files and appendices of scattered papers.

 

They provided a second report in collaboration with Arid Recovery to test the ecological application of the telemetry approach.


Link
to their page

Download their report [1 MB] on the wealth of telemetry data in Australia and New Zealand.

Download their final report [2.2MB] on the ecological application of telemetry using a case study provided by Arid Recovery.


 

 

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Last Updated on Thursday, 04 September 2014 10:47